Amazing Airsoft Guns - Getting the Best Out of Your Airsoft Gun

So you've decided to invest in an airsoft gun. That's a smart move. It's something that will bring you endless pleasure and satisfaction over the years. Whether you can just use it for recreational shooting, target practice, competitions or you join in one of the many popular airsoft games, your airsoft guns will bring challenge and fascination to your everyday life. Here's how to get the best out of your airsoft gun.

First, let's look at the buying of an airsoft gun. You can choose from a whole range of models from simple spring airsoft guns up to repeating airsoft rifles. Which model you choose, depends on your needs and preferences and of course your budget. The best thing to do is to visit the web site of an online vendor and browse the illustrated catalogues for something that appeals. Or you could ask a friend already involved with airsoft guns. Remember, you must be at least 18 years old to legally buy an airsoft gun. Having bought your airsoft gun, you'll need to become familiar with it. The best way to get to know your gun is on a firing range.

Now, here are some tips on using and taking care of your new weapon.

Firstly, never take your gun out into a public place. Though air-soft guns have special markings on the end of the barrel to identify them, sometimes even law enforcement officers cannot distinguish them from the real thing. This can cause serious problems, so when transporting your gun, make sure it's out of sight.

Taking care of your air-soft gun is quite straightforward. When it comes to cleaning and maintaining, a simple oiling and cleaning is enough. Just be sure the safety is on and the gun is free of any ammunition. Just put a few drops of silicon oil onto the moving parts and then fire the gun in the muzzle up position a couple of times to spread the oil around. Never use petroleum lubricants. Other than that, just wipe you weapon with a clean cloth after use and use a cotton bud to clear out dirt, grit or excess oil.

To keep you airsoft gun in top condition you need to use only quality plastic pellets. Stick to 6 mm quality BBs and never use pellets made of lead or any other metal.

When it comes to storing your air-soft gun, you'll need to make sure it's in a safe place away from children. Also be sure to store the ammunition separate from the gun itself. If you're not planning to use your gun for a while, you need to clean, dry, empty and uncock it before storage.

For owners of electric airsoft guns, there are a few more things you need to take care of. When storing, you should unplug the battery. One essential rule is to always make sure you're using the right battery. A wrong power source could seriously damage the mechanical parts of the gun such as motor, piston, and gears. Finally, electric guns use fuses. If for some reason your gun is not functioning, this is the first thing you should check after the battery.

If your gun jams, stop using it immediately. Check the barrel for any obstruction. Use a cleaning rod to make sure there's nothing blocking the barrel. Then fire the gun with no pellet in it. If it fires, you can try putting in a pellet and firing it. The main causes of a jammed air-soft gun are a dirty barrel or dirty or misshapen pellets. Choosing quality ammo and regularly cleaning your weapon pays dividends.

If you're participating in air soft games, there are some things you need to consider. Firstly, never play airsoft games in a public place such as a park. Next, be sure to adequately protect yourself. In particular, full face protection is essential as your eyes and teeth are vulnerable. Use goggles that can withstand the impact of a high speed plastic pellet. Masks are even better. And never remove your eye protection while in the field. Neck, elbow and knee protection is also recommended. Always keep your safety catch on while in the safe zone.

In actual fact, using air soft guns is a very safe activity provided you take a few simple precautions. It's mostly a matter of common sense. So whether you want a simple spring air soft gun or your taste tends towards sophisticated air soft rifles, start getting the most out of your weapon today.




guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns

Gun Locks and Gun Safes - Sensible Or Stupid?

Simply owning a gun is its own best use. Each year millions of crimes are prevented simply by the presence of a gun. The Bureau of Justice states that you have a 1-in-4 chance of being involved in a violent crime during your lifetime. So, in order to protect yourself, your family, and your property, you must own a gun. But ownership without proficiency is the same as owning a toaster.

You must spend time using your weapon of choice so that you know what to do when a random situation calls for the use of a firearm. Go to a firing range and learn how to use your gun.

There is a long debate in America about gun locks and gun safes. Some people hold the view that all guns should be locked in a gun safe, or that the gun should be disabled by using a locking mechanism that prevents the trigger from being engaged. They cite the number of children who are wounded or killed each year when they find a gun in their home and play with it. They also tell stories of victims who have had their gun taken away from them and used against them in a crime.

While that side of the debate sounds reasonable, it ignores reality. Gun ownership offers protection, even if the only reason you bought the gun is for sporting use. The truth is that in actual crimes, seconds count. Police show up in minutes or hours. So your personal safety and protection are YOUR RESPONSIBILITY. If you are forced to deal with an imminent threat of violent crime, fumbling with a gun lock or the key to your gun safe could easily cost you your life.

I am not against gun safes. I have my long guns in my gun safe. But my gun safe is used for storing valuables...my guns...not protecting us from ourselves. In the event of a burglary while no one's here, the perps could not get my guns easily. I also have handguns that are kept in my home that are not in a safe. I've always heard it said that a handgun is what you use to protect yourself while you are on your way to get your rifle. That seems to be a good adage.

When I was a boy, my father had two guns, a .22 cal bolt action rifle and a 12 gauge shotgun. Both of these guns stood in the back of Dad's closet, behind his hanging dress shirts. Dad told me as a very young boy not to touch the guns without him being present. Then, he took me out in the woods and SHOWED ME the destructive force of each gun by actually shooting something. The first thing that happened is that the sound of the gun going off scared me half to death. Then I got to see the hole that he shot clean through a piece of plywood with the tiny rifle bullet. I plugged my ears when the shotgun was fired, and my little eyes widened when I saw the big hole the shot made in that plywood.

Dad SHOWED me, and then DEMYSTIFIED the gun with examples. I loved guns as a kid and regularly strapped on my Fanner 50 pistols and played Cowboys. I became an expert shot with my Daisy BB rifle. But I never touched Dad's guns without him being with me. Dad was always cool about allowing me to hold the guns with him by my side. And we went hunting together and used the guns.

I did the exact same thing with all three of my children, two sons and one daughter. We never had any problem with guns and children in my home.

So, I am on the other side of the debate. I believe that the way to prevent gun accidents with children is to teach them about guns. Let them hear a gun roar when it is discharged. Let them fire weapons in a safe environment. Take the romance and mystery out of guns by showing your children what guns can do. Respect flows from reality.

I also believe that disabling a firearm with some kind of lock could get you killed by a perpetrator who is not bothered by such nonsense. No matter what gun lock you might use, it slows down your response time in the very moment you need the gun.

So, I believe that all of the ordinances and laws passed that require gun owners to lock up their guns are based in stupidity. I'm not suggesting that you break the law. I'm just sayin' that when reality is pitted against regulation, reality should seize the day.



guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns

Guns and Children

The opening statement that this booklet was: "Each year more than 20,000 people under 20 are killed or injured by guns in the United States." Almost immediately following that was the comment, "But too often, gun policy debates focus on the rights of adults to own guns and pay scant attention to issues of children's safety."

I thought, "Oh, oh, here we go again-an argument for more gun control."

Certainly, none of us wants to see children die by the gun, either by accident or by deliberate acts. But, that, in itself, is not any rationale for more gun control laws.

This booklet advocated educating parents to protect their children from gun violence, "either by choosing not to keep guns in the home, or by storing guns locked, unloaded, and separate from ammunition."

When I was a young shaver, my father kept a shotgun in his little cubicle of a home office, (he actually was a laborer). We were taught NEVER to touch that gun. And from the punishments that had been meted out to us in the past for far less serious infractions, we knew he meant business, and we never did touch it!

However, if we wanted to go with him hunting, or be with him target practicing, we were allowed. In our family, we children, were never encouraged to have our own guns, though my oldest brother knew how to shoot a 22. In those days, many parents, including my own, frowned on pointing even toy guns at another person, though the enforcement wasn't quite as strict.

This report went on to talk more about restricting access to guns by children, and then did take up the issue of "Educational Interventions to Reduce Youth Gun Injury and Violence." They listed several programs to educate children about guns.

One was the Eddie Eagle Gun Safety Program. This is a program advocated by the National Rifle Association, (NRA). I have heard gun advocates talk about this program many times. I have listened to how effective it can be. Many schools around the United States offer this program to students.

But many more schools refuse to allow students to participate in this program. Their attitude, in some cases, is that allowing this program might be viewed as support for the NRA.

The Eddie Eagle Program is taught to students from prekindergarten through grade 6. There is a motivational "big book" for the younger children, activity books for grades 2 & 3, and 4 -6, with a 7 minute video, reward stickers, parent letter, etc. "The message is: If you see a gun, stop! Don't touch. Leave the area. Tell an adult."

Gun advocates tout how effective this program is.

This publication's evaluation: "NRA cites testimonials and reductions in accidental death rates between 1991 and 1992...but no formal evaluations have been published."

Another program is "Straight Talk about Risks", (STAR), from the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence. (You remember Jim Brady was the aide to President Reagan who was severely wounded in the presidential assassination attempt.) Certainly that program ought to get an A+ by the critics?

The evaluation: "Inconsistent and inconclusive effections on attitudes and no change in behaviors. No evaluation has been published." (If no evaluation has been published, I'm not sure where this publication got the information to create their evaluation?')

It is interesting to watch how those interested in promoting their agenda `use' or `bend' the information to bolster their cause. This booklet pointed out that "Parents are arguably the best-positioned adults to monitor children's behavior and keep them safe from exposure to guns in the home and in the community."

Their take on the responsible adult is one who allows no guns in the house, or one who stores the gun, unloaded, and not in close proximity to ammunition. If a person has chosen to own a gun for personal protection against intruders, etc., how effective is having an unloaded gun `at the ready' - or for that matter, one with a safety lock? Is not the most effective control, educating the child?

The article lists a series of "Specific Policy Options" to ensure safety for the youth of America:

"Require background checks on all gun sales, including private sales, to prevent the illegal sale of guns to minors" That's interesting. You would require background checks simply to check someone's age? When someone who appears to be under 21 years old goes into a liquor store, does the store clerk make him/her fill out a background check form, and make the customer wait until the information comes back in a few minutes or a few days? I don't think so. A check on the person's driver's license usually suffices! So what is the real purpose of the background check? Certainly not the age aspect.

And as I'm sure you've heard time and time again, the person who is likely to fail a background check, is not usually the person who is attempting to buy a gun at a gun shop or a gun show.

Here's another: This was listed under what state legislatures could do. "Require handgun owners to obtain a safety license and to register their handguns with local law enforcement, similar to the system in place for automobiles, (my italics), to deter gun owners from transferring their weapons to youth."

"Limit handgun sales to one per month, to reduce `straw purchases' from gun stores."

When I first was elected to the N.H. House of Representatives, some 16 years ago, I would probably have listed myself as a fairly staunch supporter of gun control... probably leaning to ban a major portion of the types of guns sold.

Since then, I have sat through many hearings on gun control legislation, and listened to both sides. I have had almost a complete turn around on the issue.

My issue is not the usual Constitutional issue that many supporters of gun owner rights espouse. But, in the greatest philosophical sense, perhaps, I do believe that `guns don't kill', people do. Sure, sometimes in severe domestic disputes, because there is a gun around, someone may get shot and killed. And, yes, children do get killed accidentally.

But people also die in cars every day. And why? Carelessness, inattention, etc. But we don't ban them!

I really believe that the main issue in gun control is education-that is, for the ordinary citizen. There is no education about gun control for the criminal.

The criminal is not likely to go shopping in legitimate gun shops for his weapon. Why would he? He is purchasing it to engage in an illegal and criminal act!

Common sense, and real cooperation on the part of our school systems would go a long ways in stopping accidental shooting of our youth. I'm in favor of mandatory education about guns in our schools. Not mandatory education in how to use them, but how to act safely around them.

If someone chooses to allow their child to handle a weapon, perhaps there should be mandatory training on how to use it safely.

We could engage in banning a lot of things that are dangerous to us. Have you ever seen the statistics on how many people choke to death on a bone in a restaurant? Perhaps we need a law to prohibit the sale of any chicken that is not boneless?

Let's tackle the real core of the problem, instead of passing law after law, banning this thing and that thing. Of course, that will mean we will have to assume more personal responsibility.




guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns
guns